Posts Tagged ‘Book Excerpt’

Four Great Certainties

Four Great Certainties

John W. Robbins

Life is filled with uncertainty. Floods, fires, earthquakes, and hurricanes destroy our homes and cities; criminals take our lives, our property, our families, and our friends. The nightly news brings reports and rumors of war. We may lose our jobs, our homes, our health, or our businesses; people we trust may break their promises; friends may disappoint us. Things and people that we count on may let us down.

Everyone is trying to find something certain, someplace to stand. And there are some things that are certain. Here are four things that we should never doubt–four great certainties. In a world filled with uncertainty, there are some things that we can know for sure.

First Certainty: And as it is appointed for men to die once,

Second Certainty: but after this the judgment,

Third Certainty: so Christ was offered once to bear the sins of many.

Fourth Certainty: To those who eagerly wait for him he will appear a second time, apart from sin, for salvation.

–The Holy Bible

God’s Plan to Save His People

God’s Plan to Save His People

God Is Great and Good

There is only one living and true God, perfect, sovereign, holy, wise, eternal, invisible, almighty, unchangeable, just, merciful, everywhere present, and knowing all things. God exists in three persons: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. Angels and men, and every other creature, owe God whatever service, worship, and obedience he requires of them.

“Behold the nations are as a drop in a bucket, and are counted as the small dust on the balance…. All nations before him are as nothing. And they are counted by him less than nothing and worthless…. It is he who sits above the circle of the Earth, and its inhabitants are like grasshoppers, who stretches out the heavens like a curtain, and spreads them out like a tent to dwell in. He brings the princes to nothing; he makes the judges of the Earth useless…. He gives power to the weak, and to those who have no might he increases strength. Even the youths shall faint and be weary, and their young men shall utterly fall, but those who wait on the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles, they shall run and not be weary, they shall walk and not faint.”

“All the inhabitants of the Earth are reputed as nothing; he does according to his will in the army of Heaven and among the inhabitants of the Earth. No one can restrain his hand or say to him, ëWhat have you done?í”

Civilization and the Protestant Reformation

Civilization and the Protestant Reformation

Civilization as we know it began a few minutes before noon, October 31, 1517.

In the small east German town of Wittenberg, a 34-year-old Augustinian priest walked to Castle Church and nailed 95 theological propositions for debate on the door. The debate Martin Luther began nearly 500 years ago turned the world upside down. Democracy, civil rights and liberties, constitutional government, religious liberty, and the free market all find their roots in the Reformation.

A Religious Fundraising Scam

The occasion for the debate was the fundraising practices of the pope’s representatives in Germany. As a Catholic priest, Luther was concerned that a representative of the pope was telling his parishioners that they could purchase forgiveness for their sins. Luther knew that God alone could forgive sins, and that salvation could not be purchased for any amount of money: It was a free gift of God.

Saving Faith by Gordon H. Clark

Saving Faith

Gordon H. Clark

Though the Larger Catechism does not address itself directly to the psychological analysis of faith or belief, this problem is one that has merited the attention, not only of Christian theologians, but also of secular philosophers. These secularists, even when they are not so successful as the theologians, have one advantage; to wit, their task is simpler because they do not consider religious complications. Many theological discussions fall into confusion because elements necessary to saving faith are assigned to any belief whatever. Here one must first try to analyze belief as such, and then characterize those beliefs, or that belief, which justifies.

The usual evangelical analysis of belief separates it into three parts: notitia, assensus, and fiducia-or understanding, assent, and trust. Perhaps even theologians who use this analysis might omit fiducia if they confined themselves to belief as such; for in a colloquial manner a person who believes that Columbus discovered America in 1492, or in 1374, is not taken as an example of trust. Yet is he not actually an example of confidence?

The Logos by Gordon H Clark

The Logos

Gordon H. Clark

Editor’s note: Dr. Gordon Clark gave this lecture titled “The Logos” to the teachers at Chattanooga Christian School in Chattanooga, Tennessee, in 1984, the same year that The Biblical Doctrine of Man was published.

By your gracious invitation I am here this morning to lecture, as it was suggested to me, on the first verse of John’s Gospel, where Christ is called the Logos. I published a small book on The Johannine Logos, and if anything in this short lecture interests you, you will find more complete exposition in that book.

Statistics may not provide the most interesting type of introduction, but it does not burden the brain nor injure the intellect to know that John’s Gospel uses the term Logos forty times. What is more surprising, indeed disconcerting, is that the Greek term logos can be translated by forty different English words. Liddell and Scott’s great lexicon has more than five columns, each ninety lines long, of its various meanings. The word word is hardly ever the correct translation. Liddell and Scott say explicitly that it “rarely means a single word” (page 1058, column 2).

The reason our Bibles translate logos as word is that Jerome, a monk of the early fifth century, mistranslated it as verbum. Jerome’s Vulgate, as it is called, became the official Bible of the Roman Catholic Church, and the texts Jerome used have become the mainstay of contemporary liberal versions. The Latin term Verbum became Word in English, though I do not know why it did not become verb, as it actually is in a new Catholic French version, La Bible de Jerusalem. At any rate, Logos hardly ever means a single word. But it has forty or more other meanings.

The Complete Green Letters – Faith

The Complete Green Letters

by Miles Stanford

Chapter 1 – Faith

Complete Green Letters, The

The Complete Green Letters – Time

The Complete Green Letters

by Miles Stanford

Chapter 2 – Time

Complete Green Letters, The

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